“If you were part of this movement in 1990, you can say emphatically: Times have changed.” — Josie Byzek

Is the world perfect now? Of course not. But we asked for access and protection from discrimination and the right to live in our communities instead of in nursing homes — and we’ve gained a lot of ground.

The Road to Freedom, by Rachel Bridges/Museum of disABILITY History/People Inc.

The Road to Freedom, by Rachel Bridges/Museum of disABILITY History/People Inc.

Integrated Dance, by Mary Lou Mobley

Integrated Dance, by Mary Lou Mobley

Redirect 25 Percent of Medicaid Dollars from Nursing Homes to Community-Based Services, by Tom Olin

Redirect 25 Percent of Medicaid Dollars from Nursing Homes to Community-Based Services, by Tom Olin

We Shall Overcome, by Tom Olin

We Shall Overcome, by Tom Olin

Capitol Elevator, by Mary Lou Mobley

Capitol Elevator, by Mary Lou Mobley

Capitol Protest,  by Tom Olin

Capitol Protest, by Tom Olin

Capitol Rehab, by Mary Lou Mobley

Capitol Rehab, by Mary Lou Mobley

Nursing Homes Kill, by Tom Olin

Nursing Homes Kill, by Tom Olin

Community Gardening, by Mary Lou Mobley

Community Gardening, by Mary Lou Mobley

Community Music, by Mary Lou Mobley

Community Music, by Mary Lou Mobley

 

“They say the devil is in the details. Well, so is redemption.” — Tim Gilmer

The signing of the ADA 25 years ago prompted profound changes to the built environment. Improvement in access has opened up much of life, allowing us to participate in our communities and be accepted as parents, as consumers, as people.

 

Parenting, by Loren Worthington

Parenting, by Loren Worthington

The Lincoln Memorial, by Mary Lou Mobley

The Lincoln Memorial, by Mary Lou Mobley

Farmer's Market, by Loren Worthington

Farmer’s Market, by Loren Worthington

 Pool Lift, by Lawrence Roffee

Pool Lift, by Lawrence Roffee

Shopping, by Mary Lou Mobley

Shopping, by Mary Lou Mobley

The Signing of the ADA, by Tom Olin

The Signing of the ADA, by Tom Olin

Chained to Revolving Door, by Tom Olin

Chained to Revolving Door, by Tom Olin

Accessible Door, by Lawrence Roffee

Accessible Door, by Lawrence Roffee

Buses are for Everyone, by Tom Olin

Buses are for Everyone, by Tom Olin

The Road to Freedom, by Rachel Bridges/Museum of disABILITY History/People Inc.

The ADA Tour Bus, by Rachel Bridges

Related Exhibit
“Images of Disability Pride,” by photographers with disabilities (Lawrence Roffee, Christopher Voelker, Mary Lou Mobley and Loren Worthington), will run as part of “25/40” — a celebration of the 25th anniversary of the ADA and the 40th anniversary of Very Special Arts. It takes place at the Kennedy Center, in collaboration with the Smithsonian, from July 16 to July 26. Other events include free performances, lectures, dance parties, film festivals and more. www.2540celebration.com.