By Karl Beck

Greg Queen shares his passion for motorcycles with his son, Braden.

Greg Queen shares his passion for motorcycles with his son, Braden.

Something about motorcycles captures the imagination. They’ve been part of American culture and society for decades, although many see them as the central element of a counterculture that thumbs its nose at the quiet, buttoned-down world. However, for many motorcyclists, getting together with their friends at big rallies, donating to charitable causes and supporting veterans is a large part of their lifestyle.

Motorcycles mean different things to different people. For some, owning a motorcycle is a hobby. Leisure time is spent on long rides and enjoying the feeling of freedom and adventure brought by cruising down an unfamiliar road. For others motorcycles are a sport, a competition against other riders, the clock and grueling terrain. And for still other riders, the motorcycle is the center of an alternate lifestyle.

For Ron Hurley, a T8 para from Seminole, Fla., motorcycle riding is both part of his life and a hobby. He modified his first motorcycle in 1971 and now has both a Harley-Davidson and a Yamaha V-Max. He also owns a 24-foot trailer equipp